Harnessing the potential of
next-generation DNA sequencing
for diagnostics!

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Bringing genetic testing
to clinical practice

At Genomill Health, our vision is to make genetic testing a standard clinical practice. Genetic testing is developing rapidly and is already affecting clinical procedures. For instance, liquid biopsies are permitting non-invasive cancer diagnostics, and affordable genome sequencing is permitting tailored medication for diverse conditions from cardiological problems to depression.

However, broad adoption of genetically informed medicine is currently slowed down by relatively expensive tests and a long turn-over time of the results. Our mission is to change this by creatively tapping into the analytical potential of next-generation DNA sequencing.

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Harnessing the potential of
next-generation DNA sequencing
for diagnostics

Human genetics has been advancing in leaps since the introduction of next-generation DNA sequencing in 2005. While the first human genome, completed in 2003, cost a total of 3 billion dollars, currently one can have his or her genome sequenced for around 1000 dollars.

In a clinical setting, only a fraction of genetic tests actually require sequencing the whole genome of an individual. Rather, typical use cases include targeted sequencing of just a few genomic areas, or detecting rare, untypical mutations against a healthy genetic background.

The next-generation sequencing devices are highly sophisticated analytical platforms that permit such targeted, quantitative sequencing when applied in creative ways.

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

Pushing the technical
boundaries to permit affordable
clinical genetics for all

We are discovering novel ways to permit highly accurate and cost-efficient genetic testing by combining approaches from molecular biology and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies.

We are designing highly customized molecular probes that permit targeting sequencing of thousands of specifically selected genome areas, and recovering quantitative information from unusual mutations, for instance oncological markers.

This permits highly accurate genetic tests with just a fraction of the current costs and turnover times.